Personal Injury Attorneyin Summerville, SC.

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What Should You Do After a Car Accident in South Carolina?

The moments following the crash are often a blur when you're involved in a car accident. However, per South Carolina law, those on the scene must adhere to legal responsibilities and obligations.

First, try to stop your car and ensure it is positioned safely near the scene of the crash. Then, call 911 to report the accident. While most folks go into full-blown panic mode, you need to stay calm so you can process the situation. If you notice that there are injured people, give them "reasonable assistance." Per South Carolina Code of Laws, that could include transporting hurt people to a hospital or calling an ambulance for them.

If you're in a car crash, you need to be prepared to exchange contact information with other drivers at the accident scene. If the person who caused the collision is present, make sure to get their name, phone number, address, and insurance info. If witnesses are present, get their contact info, too, in case our team needs to obtain their account later.

Next, try to piece together how the car crash happened. This is an appropriate time to take photos of the cars, wreckage, and debris. Ask yourself if you think a vehicle failed to follow the rules of the road, like speeding or failing to stop at a stop sign.

Regardless of how minor your injuries may appear and who may be to blame for the accident, get legal advice from Theos Law Firm first before giving any recorded statements or refusing medical care.

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A Personal Injury Attorney in Summerville, SC You Can Trust

Time and again, auto accident victims agree to early settlements provided by insurance companies because the offer seems like a lot. But what if you return to work after recovering from an accident, only for your pain to return?

With adjusters, lawyers, and investigators at their disposal, insurance agencies will do everything in their power to minimize the compensation you deserve. Don't let them pick on you or silence your voice. If you or a loved are victims of a negligent car or truck accident in South Carolina, contact Theos Law Firm today. We have the team, tools, and experience to fight back on your behalf, no matter how complicated your case may seem.

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To schedule an appointment for your free consultation, contact Theos Law Firm in Summerville today.

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Latest News in Summerville, SC

‘The future is growth’: Summerville businesses agree with proposed development

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Some businesses say prioritizing a sense of place in the town of Summerville is most important and sometimes that means new development, despite what some people might think.Dorchester County has a proposed plan to turn 500 N. Main St., also...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Some businesses say prioritizing a sense of place in the town of Summerville is most important and sometimes that means new development, despite what some people might think.

Dorchester County has a proposed plan to turn 500 N. Main St., also known as their main county building, into a hotel, retail spaces, a parking garage and more.

Some businesses located in the heart of Summerville, like Eva’s Restaurant, think change is about time.

“If we don’t have growth, we don’t have a future,” general manager Tina Howard said.

Eva’s Restaurant has been serving the town since 1944. With the proposed development, Howard says she’s not worried about competition.

“I think it would benefit us as a small business with, you know, bringing in tourists,” Howard said. “...I don’t feel it would hurt us personally because we have such a strong, established business.”

Diane Frankenberger, the owner of People, Places & Quilts, says she’s watched Summerville grow for over 30 years. She says with the old post office as the new public works art center, the old Coca-Cola company as the new YMCA and an old hardware store as her own business, she believes both the county and town councils prioritize preservation.

“You have to go forward with the future,” Frankenberger said. “We still can’t have the same houses around here and the old town hall and no computers and blah blah blah. And so, it’s keeping a sense of place, but moving forward with an eye towards the future.”

The county has already approved plans to preserve part of the county building, which once was the old hospital, and improve the current Veteran’s monument.

“I think when people are calling names or say, ‘Don’t do something,’ let’s wait and see and work together and make the best use of what we’ve got there,” Frankenberger said.

Howard says she wants her 6-year-old grandson to be able to experience a flourishing Summerville, just like she has all her life.

“A lot of people complain about the growth and ‘People will stop coming here, we’re full, don’t come here,’” Howard said. “Without growth, we don’t have a future. The future is growth.”

Frankenberger says she’s ready to move forward.

“No more gas on the fire,” Frankenberger said. “Let’s put water on the fire.”

Dorchester County provided the following statement about the proposed plan:

Dorchester County is looking forward to having greater capacity and flexibility to complete the following projects from fee revenues of the redevelopment:

Funding to preserve the façade of the old hospital building.

A new civic park and improvements to the Veterans Memorial.

An additional $8 Million in funding to DD2 schools to supplement $2 Million from the TIF.

Provide $20 Million in funding for a Community Recreation Facility in the Summerville area.

Provide $2 Million in additional funding for streetscaping and improvements to Main Street and Cedar Street.

Provide credits for workforce housing for teachers, firefighters, law enforcement, and first responders within the multi-family development for at least 15 years.

A modern County office building and additional Class A Office Space in the downtown area.

A new downtown hotel and restaurant to provide much-needed retail and hospitality amenities in the downtown area.

Create additional parking by providing for the construction of a parking garage in the downtown area.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Football players receive All-State honors

Ashley Ridge and Summerville landed multiple players on the South Carolina Football Coaches Association 2023 5A All-State Team.The association released its all-state teams for all five high school league classifications Dec. 15. Both the Swamp Foxes and Green Wave had players receive first-team honors.Summerville quarterback Jaden Cummings, receiver Yannick Smith and lineman Adam Traylor were named to the 5A Offense First Team. Green Wave lineman Jacob Cotterill and outside linebacker Kayden Gaddist were named to the first-team...

Ashley Ridge and Summerville landed multiple players on the South Carolina Football Coaches Association 2023 5A All-State Team.

The association released its all-state teams for all five high school league classifications Dec. 15. Both the Swamp Foxes and Green Wave had players receive first-team honors.

Summerville quarterback Jaden Cummings, receiver Yannick Smith and lineman Adam Traylor were named to the 5A Offense First Team. Green Wave lineman Jacob Cotterill and outside linebacker Kayden Gaddist were named to the first-team defense. Receiving honorable mention honors for the Green Wave were Evan Howell-Smith, Ike Rutherford, Jaiden Kelly, Julius Brown, Trae Green, and John Corley.

Ashley Ridge senior Dwayne Simmons received first-team honors as both a tight end and offensive lineman. Swamp Fox receiver Derrick Salley was also named to the first-team offense. Ashley Ridge offensive lineman Kevin Cobbs received honorable mention honors.

Other local athletes receiving first-team honors include Berkeley receiver Kevin Boone; Cane Bay offensive lineman Andrew Tumbleston, defensive lineman William Coker and athlete Parker Osborne; Goose Creek quarterback Meliq McGowan; Stratford offensive linemen Wes Snoden and Landon Stradcutter; and West Ashley inside linebacker Jerry Grant.

Others receiving honorable mention honors are Berkeley’s Marcus Henderson and Henry Rivers; Cane Bay’s Keaton Cooley; Stratford’s Markell Holman and Jachin Davis; and West Ashley’s Andrew Jackson.

Teams from several states will come to the Lowcountry Dec. 28-30 for the 13th annual Carolina Invitational high school basketball tournament.

If one is a basketball fan, there will be ample opportunity to see some quality hoops during the tournament, and with 15 gyms hosting games, there is no need to travel far. Host sites include Ashley Ridge, Cane Bay, Cathedral Academy, Fort Dorchester, Stratford, Summerville, Bishop England, Burke, First Baptist, James Island, Oceanside Collegiate, Palmetto Christian Academy, Philip Simmons and Porter-Gaud high schools.

Over the past 12 years, the Carolina Invitational has featured teams from the Carolinas, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Canada and Australia. This year’s event will follow a showcase format, with all teams playing one game a day and guaranteed three games against schools with similar levels or enrollment sizes. Visit lowcountryinvitational.com for a full schedule.

The Summerville girls will host North Oconee County (Georgia) for their first game at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 28. The Lady Green Wave will face Calvary Day at 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 29 and play Frederick Douglas (Lexington, Kentucky) at 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 30.

The Pinewood Prep girls will play Halls Knoxville, Tennessee) at 3:15 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 28, at Philip Simmons, Chapmanville (West Virginia) at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 29, at Stratford and Stratford at noon Saturday, Dec. 30, on the Knights’ home court.

The Pinewood Prep boys will play Oceanside Collegiate at 7 p.m. Dec. 28 at Oceanside, Chapin at 12:45 p.m. Dec. 29 at Philip Simmons and Gaffney at 3 p.m. Dec. 30 at Stratford.

The Ashley Ridge girls will host Grant County (Kentucky) for their first game at 6 p.m. Dec. 28. The Lady Swamp Foxes will play Hilton Head Christian at 3 p.m. Dec. 29 and George Washington at 3 p.m. Dec. 30.

The Ashley Ridge boys will host Grant County at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 28. The Swamp Foxes will also play Walnut Hills at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 29 and Calvary Day (North Carolina) at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 30.

The Fort Dorchester girls will host David Crockett (Tennessee) for their first game at 7 p.m. Dec. 28. The Lady Patriots will also face Carrolton at 2:30 p.m. Dec. 29 and Wando at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 30.

The Cathedral Academy girls will host Westminster (Georgia) at 6 p.m. Dec. 28 for their first game. The Generals will also play Hanahan at 3 p.m. Dec. 29 and West Ashley at 3 p.m. Dec. 30.

The Cathedral Academy boys will host Westminster at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 28 for their first game. The Generals will also face Veritas at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 29 and Coastal Home at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 30.

The Cane Bay girls will host Howard Tech (Deleware) at 6 p.m. Dec. 28. The Lady Cobras will also play Spartanburg at 3 p.m. Dec. 29 and Greensboro Day at noon Dec. 30.

The Cane Bay boys will play Howard Tech at 7:30 p.m. for their first game. The Cobras will also face Halls at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 29 and Wren at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 30.

Summerville mayoral candidates discuss key issues facing the growing town

SUMMERVILLE — With Ricky Waring retiring, the mayoral seat in this growing community 20 miles north of Charleston is up for grabs.The candidates: Dickie Miler, a Summerville native and real estate broker; Russ Touchberry, another Summerville native and current town councilman; and Vickie Fagan, who relocated from Staten Island more than a ...

SUMMERVILLE — With Ricky Waring retiring, the mayoral seat in this growing community 20 miles north of Charleston is up for grabs.

The candidates: Dickie Miler, a Summerville native and real estate broker; Russ Touchberry, another Summerville native and current town councilman; and Vickie Fagan, who relocated from Staten Island more than a decade ago.

The Post and Courier spoke with the mayoral candidates about some of the big issues and concerns residents have in Summerville.

Fate of the old hospital

Miler said the property at 500 N. Main St., which has become a hot-button issue over the past few months, should be preserved. He has been a vocal opponent of the redevelopment of the property but said if there is redevelopment it should be strategic, sensible and promote enough economic vitality to warrant any changes made.

Touchberry hopes to preserve the old hospital as well, acknowledging it’s an important property. He also said its redevelopment can benefit the town and if done right could be a model for how other properties can be remade.

“We’ve lost the look and feel of Summerville on that side of the railroad tracks all the way to I-26,” Touchberry said. “This is an opportunity for us to have this reinvestment and reestablish our brand, which is what made us so special to begin with.”

Fagan also wants the property to be preserved but believes it can be repurposed as is. With all the available parking, the space could be used for emergency personnel, she said.

Growth and development

Miler said he supports a strategic approach to Summerville’s growth and would want to annex all he could on the periphery to protect the town’s border from neighboring cities like North Charleston and Goose Creek, which are also growing quickly.

“If we annex things on the outside, then we can control how we develop on the inside,” Miler said. “When and if we have to move and grow, we do it the way we want to do it, bringing the developer we want to bring in, have the neighborhood designed the way we want it.”

Touchberry pointed out that Summerville’s municipal boundaries are irregular but could be fixed by aligning the town’s comprehensive plan with the plans of Berkeley and Dorchester counties, and making sure all zoning standards line up as well. He added that if the town doesn’t have a strategic annexation plan, Summerville could easily be encircled by other municipalities.

Fagan said she’d like to assemble a task force for growth management and include voices from elected officials, civic groups and businesses. She said she values input from everyone and paying attention to how growth is affecting people in different areas can help the town come up with a plan as a united front.

Traffic and transport

Miler said he would want to incorporate more public transportation and improve sidewalks and bike paths so people can get around without a car.

“Building more roads is not always the answer,” Miler said.

He added he would be willing to reduce the median for some roads and even remove parking spots — like the parallel parking spots on Main Street at Hutchinson Square — so traffic isn’t as backed up.

Touchberry has been advocating for infrastructure improvements, such as sidewalk repairs, but one of his biggest priorities is finding a way to connect the Berlin G. Myers Parkway to Interstate 26 without the need to use, or cross, Main Street. He said he’s working with the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, as well as Berkeley County and the town, to study that corridor and identify solutions.

Touchberry added that the town missed an opportunity in having the Lowcountry Rapid Transit stop in Summerville; the furthest it is planned to go for now is Ladson. He said he’s ready to fight to make sure the second phase is completed, so the workforce in Summerville can use it to get to Charleston and reduce commute time.

Lowes Foods to open Summerville store, close others

Lowes Foods, a Carolinas-based grocer, is opening a fifth store in the Charleston market in Summerville, while the company plans to close other locations.The Summerville store will be 50,887 square feet and will anchor a new retail center between two large Berkeley County residential developments, according to a news release. The new Lowes Foods store, scheduled to open in 2025, is on the northeast side of the 5,000-acre Nexton community.In addition, Lowes Foods has acquired Foothills IGA Market in Marble Hill, Ga., the release...

Lowes Foods, a Carolinas-based grocer, is opening a fifth store in the Charleston market in Summerville, while the company plans to close other locations.

The Summerville store will be 50,887 square feet and will anchor a new retail center between two large Berkeley County residential developments, according to a news release. The new Lowes Foods store, scheduled to open in 2025, is on the northeast side of the 5,000-acre Nexton community.

In addition, Lowes Foods has acquired Foothills IGA Market in Marble Hill, Ga., the release stated This will be the brand’s first store in Georgia. The store will continue to operate as an IGA for the next few months and will become a Lowes Foods store sometime in early 2024.

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Along with the expansion, Lowes Foods will be making the decision to close two stores, the release stated. Food Country purchased the location in Stuart, Va., at the end of September. The store in Yadkinville, N.C., will be closing at the end of this month. Employees in the Yadkinville store are being given opportunities in other Lowes Foods.

“Lowes Foods is deeply committed to providing an exceptional shopping experience for our guests at all our store locations,” Tim Lowe, head of Retail, and Alex Lee, president, Lowes Foods said in the release. “Our coming stores in Summerville and Georgia will be important areas of growth for our company, and we’re excited about our continuing expansion in those markets. We also are pleased that Food Country has agreed to work to retain our employees in Stuart as our store there becomes part of the Food Country brand.”

In addition to Summerville and Marble Hill, Lowes has previously announced new stores in Aiken, and Kannapolis, Concord, Indian Land, and Winterville, N.C. A new store in Pittsboro, N.C., opened in June of this year.

Founded in 1954, Lowes Foods employs nearly 9,000 people and operates 82 full-service supermarkets in the Carolinas.

Charleston-area supermarket could soon become reality near planned 8,000-home community

Six years after a prominent grocery chain in the Charleston area bought land for a new store, the supermarket appears to be closer to taking shape on the edge of a planned 8,000-home community.Bidding documents show construction could begin in March 2025 on a 51,454-square-foot new ...

Six years after a prominent grocery chain in the Charleston area bought land for a new store, the supermarket appears to be closer to taking shape on the edge of a planned 8,000-home community.

Bidding documents show construction could begin in March 2025 on a 51,454-square-foot new Publix grocery store near Summerville.

Supermarket spokesman Jared Glover said the Florida-based company has not set a definite timeframe for the new store to be built “at this time.”

The food chain paid $3.05 million for 10 acres in 2017 at Beech Hill Road and Summers Drive across from the developing Summers Corner community southwest of Summerville.

Summers Corner, on S.C. Highway 61 and near U.S. Highway 17A, is a 7,200-acre tract that’s permitted for about 8,000 homes.

In addition to schools and shops, it has about 1,200 homes sold and another 250 under construction, according to Jason Byham, division president at Lennar, the homebuilder that bought the tract for more than $26 million in 2018.

Byham said he’s not surprised the long-planned Publix might be “more imminent” than in the past few years.

“We are selling about 50 homes per month on average in Summers Corner,” Byham said. “We expect to sell between 600 and 700 next year.”

Lennar also plans to develop a multi-million-dollar amenity center with a pool, restaurants and other attractions over the next two to three years on a 15-acre site off Summers Drive near Clayfield Trail.

A historic Broad Street property that’s housed banks, law firms and a publicly traded real estate company over the past 134 years or so is back under local ownership in a deal totaling $6.2 million.

An affiliate of EP Group purchased the 15,500-square-foot, three-and-a-half story building at 39 Broad St. for $5.58 million last week, according to public land records. The deal included an adjacent 16-space parking lot at 28 Elliott St., which sold for $620,000.

The seller was Healthcare Realty Trust of Tennessee.

The vacant commercial building is between East Bay and Church streets. It underwent a top-to-bottom renovation about eight years ago.

EP Group, which said it invests in middle-market, U.S. based businesses and is based on Meeting Street, plans to take part of the newly acquired property. A spokesman said the privately held company is reviewing “a range of possible plans” for the rest of the space.

“We look forward to being the stewards of this building and remaining part of the vibrant downtown community,” EP Group CEO Terry Hurley said in a written statement.

The new owner and The Post and Courier were owned by the same parent company until September 2021, when both were spun off as standalone businesses.

According to Historic Charleston Foundation, 39 Broad dates to the late 1800s — with the “marked verticality” of its arched windows among its most distinctive architectural features. The builder was Charles Otto Witte, a wealthy German-born businessman and consul for various European nations who once lived at what’s now the Ashley Hall school campus.

The structure later became known as the Exchange Bank and Trust Co. building, named for an early tenant was established in 1891. Local archives show a law firm and Merchants’ and Miners’ Bank were operating at the same address a few years earlier.

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